Rwanda

 

IFC invests in triple million fund for sub-saharan Africa

The IFC has invested in the biggest sub-Saharan Africa healthcare investment platform since Abraaj's ill-fated $1bn fund with a view to acquiring and integrating hospitals in east and southern Africa. It's still not that big.

FREE BLOG Is there a market for innovation in emerging markets?

Synlab Nigeria's chief medical officer told crowds at the launch of a new wellness centre in Lagos that previously "only outdated technologies were dumped in Africa". This might be true, but is there a market for expensive innovation? 

Sub-Saharan Africa ‘ready for investment’

HBI reports from the Sub-Saharan Africa panel at HBI 2019, where Teo Sarda, CEO of Sphera, Dr Shrey Viranna, CEO of Life, and Audrey Obara, head of healthcare for Swedfund, talked about how to sustainably invest in Africa. 

Cerba/Lancet JV to expand

Cerba is set to expand its JV with pan-African lab network Lancet into more French-speaking countries.

Interview: Guy Newing, CEO Kinect Hub

HBI speaks to Guy Newing, CEO of Kinect Hub which is an Australia-based tech company piloting a platform which rewards patients for agreeing to share their data.

Ada opens up markets with new languages

German telehealth company Ada claims that introducing new languages on its AI-powered "symptom checker" app will eventually open the market up to an additional 102 million people.

PharmAccess helps roll out Universal Healthcare Cover

PharmAccess Foundation, the pioneering Dutch NGO which has lent money to 1,000 for-profit clinics across Africa and launched an innovative mobile health payment scheme in Kenya is now working closely with governments.

Hospitals in our pockets: the future of African healthcare

Before British primary care digital health player Babylon came along, the Rwandan government had never signed a contract with a private healthcare provider. A universal healthcare coverage scheme called Mutuelles de Santé had been operating in the country since 1999, but ten years later was spending 9.7% of GDP on health. The government and its citizens needed a means to make healthcare more accessible and affordable: so in 2016 it invited a private digital health platform to help connect patients to doctors.

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